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Halloween Vocabulary List: Speech and Language Activities

Halloween Speech and Language ActivitiesHalloween Vocabulary List: Speech and Language Activities

 

Halloween is Coming! Leaves are falling. Temperatures are dropping. And pumpkins are out. Goblins, skeletons, witches oh my! Chicago Speech and More knows Halloween is right around the corner.

There is a lot of research behind the importance of incorporating meaningful vocabulary  into speech and language activities. Not only does it teach new words, using meaningful vocabulary is functional. If we tailor therapy activities to include relevant material,  children will be more engaged. When this happens, children are more apt to generalize (carry-over) skills.

Below is Chicago Speech and More’s Halloween Vocabulary List. This list can be used for many goals. Depending on your child’s area (s) of need, this list can be modified for their intervention plan. Use the Halloween Vocabulary List to generate fun speech and language activities.

Chicago Speech and More’s Halloween Vocabulary List

alien dark gravestone ninja tarantula
angel demon gruesome October terrible
astronaut devil Halloween owl terrify
autumn disguise hat party thrilling
ballerina dress-up haunt pirate tomb
bat eerie haunted house potion tombstone
black cat elf hayride pretend treats
blood evil headstone pumpkin trick
boo eyeballs hocus pocus RIP trick-or-treat
boogey face paint horrify robot vampire
broomstick fairy howl scary vanish
candy fangs jack-o-lantern scream wand
cape fall make-believe shadow web
carve fear make-up skeleton werewolf
cat firefighter magic skull wicked
cauldron frighten mask spell wig
cemetery genie monster spider witch
clown ghost moon spider web witch hat
costume ghoul moonlight spook wizard
cowboy goblin mummy spooky wizardy
cowgirl goodies night strange zombie
creepy grave nightmare sweets

 

How to Adapt the Halloween Vocabulary List for Speech and Language Activities

Speech (Articulation Therapy): If your child is working on a specific sound or group of sounds simply find the target (sound/group/process) within this list.

Here are some examples of how to use the Halloween list as a guide for speech therapy:

  • /s/ is the target: spook, face paint, sweets, etc.
  • /s/ blends: scary, skeleton, spooky, etc.
  • /l/ blends: black cat, blood, clown
  • /r/: robot, creepy, October, werewolf, etc.
  • multi-syllabic words: ballerina, Halloween, October, skeleton, etc.
  • Cluster Reduction: spooky, scary, blood, clown etc.

Language Activities: Depending on your child’s language needs, the Halloween list can be adapted for their therapy.

Here are some examples of how to use the Halloween vocabulary as a guide for language therapy:

  • Sequencing: Have your child tell you various Halloween-related sequences (i.e., steps to carve a pumpkin).
  • Re-telling/summarizing: Tell your child a story, using words from the Halloween list. Have them retell the story to you. Everybody loves a good ghost story.
  • Story-telling: Have your child tell you a Halloween-related story. Urge them to use words from the list.
  • Conversation: Engage your child in a conversation about Halloween-related items. Ask and encourage them to ask open-ended questions (rather than yes/no questions). Model follow-up questions.
  • Describing: Cut up the list and put the words in a box. Have your child choose a word. Your child describes the item without naming it.

These are just some suggestions but the possibilities are endless. Get creative. Add your own words and activities.

Halloween brings a ton of candy and new vocabulary words. These activities can be done before Halloween, during and after. Get in the spirit and have fun! Just make sure to talk about what you are doing while you are doing it, afterwards and then again-later!

Chicago Speech and More hopes you have a wonderful Halloween!

For more speech and language activities please refer to archive blog posts.

Phonological Process: Cluster Reduction

Boy Cluster reductionPhonological Process: Cluster Reduction

 

Phonological processes are patterns of speech errors.  Children use these processes when trying to produce adult-like speech.  These errors affect entire groups or classes of sounds. Most children demonstrate some phonological processes when acquiring language.  While these error patterns are typical and at times very cute, if they persist past a certain age they become atypical.  Cluster reduction is one of the more common phonological process.

What is cluster reduction: 

Cluster reduction is a syllable structure process. It occurs when a child reduces a consonant cluster to a single consonant. A consonant cluster is when there are 2-3 consonants next to one another in a word (“sp” in space). With the word “space”, a child using cluster reduction might say this as “pace”. Cluster reduction can occur in any word position. Medial position: lipstick becomes “liptick”.  Final position: old becomes “ol”. While cluster reduction is a common speech error, its effects can reduce a child’s speech intelligibility. As the frequency with which a child uses cluster reduction increases, his speech intelligibility decreases.

Should I be concerned if my child is using the process of cluster reduction?

Like many phonological processes, cluster reduction is common. It is present in many young children’s speech.  Usually as a child’s speech and language skills become more mature, this process corrects itself.  In typical development, cluster reduction is often eliminated by 3½ years of age. If your child continues to demonstrate cluster reduction beyond 3½ years, it is recommended that you contact a speech-language pathologist.

If you have concerns with your child’s speech and language skills please contact Samantha at Chicago Speech and More by calling (847) 774-0582 or using the contact us form on the website.

Outdoor Language Activities: At The Park

Language Activities: At The ParkOutdoor Language Activities: At the Park

 

Now that it is finally warming up we can start going outdoors.  I don’t know about you but Chicago Speech and More loves to play outside. Don’t want to break the bank? No worries. A trip to the park is free, fun and provides many opportunities for language activities. Read below for Chicago Speech and More’s favorite language activities to do while at the park.

If your local park has a great playground you are in luck. Here are some guidelines for language activities to be incorporated into an old fashioned park outing.

Swings: Swings are fun and better yet- most parks have them. Make sure that your child is in the appropriate swing for their age, size and developmental level.

  • Encourage your child to request the swings by simply saying “swing”.
  • Does your child like you to push them when they’re on the swing.  Give them a few pushes and then back off. Wait until they say “push” or say/sign “more” to start up again.
  • Play games where you pull their swing back and count “1-2-3-GO” until you drop/push their swing.  After a few times, count “1-2-3” and then wait for them to add “GO”.

Slides: Slides are definitely a favorite amongst most toddlers and children. Watch your child carefully when going on the slide. Make sure that your child can safely navigate the steps/ladder up to the slide and knows to remain seated while going down the slide.

  • Encourage your child to request the slide by simply saying “slide”.
  • When going up the stairs (or carrying your child up) model “up, up, up” as you climb. When you get to the top of the stairs encourage your child to say “down” before assisting him.
  • As your child is going down the slide say “wheeee” and encourage her to do the same. Your children will love it if you use a silly, exaggerated voice to do so.
  • After one trip down the slide, wait for your child to request another. Work to have them say “more” or “slide” or “whee” to convey to you what they want.

Sandbox: If your local park has a sandbox and you don’t mind getting dirty Chicago Speech and More says go for it.

  • Encourage your child to request the sandbox. Depending on their language abilities work with them to say “box”or “sand.”
  • Encourage them to say “in” if they want to go in or be put in the sandbox. Similarly, when they want to get “out”, wait until they say “out” to help them do so.
  • Build sand castles and hills and label what you are making.  If your child can, encourage them to use these labels as well.
  • The sandbox offers a variety of new vocabulary. Shovel, bucket, pail, sand, etc. Use these words.

Monkey Bars: Chicago Speech and More knows that monkey bars can be scary but they are also so much fun. If you watch your children carefully, the monkey bars can be safe and language rich. Depending on your child’s ability, I would recommend holding your child around the waist while they go across the bars. Regardless, make sure you are with them and spotting your child.

  • Encourage your child to request the monkey bars by saying “monkey bars”, “monkey”, “bars” or simply making the ooh-ooh-ahh-ahh monkey noise.
  • Once you are by the monkey bars model “up” as you lift your child to the bars.
  • After the first time, wait until your child either says “more”, “up”, or lifts his arms up to assist them.

Going to the park is fun, free and lets you spend time outdoors. I bet you never knew the playground offered so many language opportunities. This list is just a start. Language activities are everywhere. Don’t know which playground to head to? Click this link for Chicago’s Best Playgrounds by Chicagoparent.com

Chicago Speech and More hopes you enjoy the nice weather. Make sure to get outside and talk with your children! Stay tuned for Chicago Speech and More’s next edition of outdoor language activities.

Phonological Process: Final Consonant Deletion

Phonological Process: Final Consonant DeletionPhonological Process: Final Consonant Deletion

 

Phonological processes are patterns of speech errors.  These processes are used by children when attempting to produce adult-like speech.  These errors affect entire groups or classes of sounds. Most children demonstrate some of these processes when acquiring language.  While these error patterns are common and at times typical, if they persist past a certain age they become atypical.  Final consonant deletion is a common phonological process.

What is final consonant deletion: 

Final consonant deletion (FCD) is a syllable structure process. It occurs when children leave off the final consonant in a word sound (consonant) in a word. A child might say “co” instead of “coat” or “bea” instead of “beat”.  While final consonant deletion is a common speech error, its effects can reduce a child’s speech intelligibility or how well we understand them.

Should I be concerned if my child is using the process of final consonant deletion?

As with many phonological processes, final consonant deletion is common and is present in many young children’s speech.  Usually this process corrects itself as the child’s speech and language skills become more mature.  In typical development, final consonant deletion is typically eliminated by 3 years of age. After 3 years, your child might leave off the final consonant in a word occasionally, although most of their word endings should sound like the adult version.

If your child continues to demonstrate the phonological process of final consonant deletion beyond 3 years, it is highly recommended that you contact a speech-language pathologist.

If you have concerns with your child’s speech and language skills please contact Samantha at Chicago Speech and More by calling (847) 774-0582 or using the contact us form on the website.

My First Words-Flashcards app for Speech Language Therapy

speech language therapy iPad appMy First Words-Flashcards app for Speech Language Therapy

 

Are you inundated with iPad apps? With so many apps out there it is hard to know which are worth your time and money. Chicago Speech and More recommends My First Words-Flaschards by Alligator Apps  for helping to improve your child’s expressive vocabulary skills. This app can be a great addition to speech language therapy sessions.

My First Words-Flashcards is available on both the iPad and the iPhone and is a great tool for parents and speech pathologists. The app provides over 200 interactive and colorful flashcards to engage and motivate toddlers. My First Words-Flashcards is split up into a variety of functional, early developing language categories. You can choose to target specific categories such as: accessories, actions, animals, baby things, body, clothing, feelings, food, mommy’s purse, on wheels, shapes and toys.  Where you start depends on your child or client’s language needs.  There are 8 fun and exciting game modes to play. Oh, and just one small thing. It’s Free.

My First Words-Flaschards is a multi-sensory learning tool that can boost any speech language therapy session. In addition to the colorful and engaging graphics, the words are written and spoken with each flashcard. As your child begins to master the various levels, the sound can be switched off to encourage independent language production.  Don’t like something- don’t worry. This app is fully customizable. Don’t like the font? The size of the font? The case of the letters? Change it! You can even delete or add cards within a category.

I have incorporated this app into my speech language therapy sessions and it’s great. Not only do I find this app to be extremely successful, my clients LOVE it.  The little ones enjoy tapping the pictures to see the next flashcard.  With so many categories, my clients never get bored.  I have seen great progress when this app is used as part of a speech language therapy program.  Chicago Speech and More highly recommends My First Words-Flashcards.

What makes My First Words-Flashcards so great is that with just one app, you have hundreds of picture cards spanning a ton of categories at your fingertips.  Say good-bye to lugging (and buying) twenty packs of vocabulary cards and hello to the future of speech therapy.

Chicago Speech and More’s Mother’s Day Vase

Chicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Craft

Chicago Speech and More’s Mother’s Day Vase

Being a mother is one of the toughest jobs out there. Chicago Speech and More knows how special a mom is. While we should be honoring the “mothers” in our lives on a regular basis, Mother’s Day is the perfect opportunity to do so. There is no better way to let your mom, grandma, aunt, step-mom, sister, best friend, family friend, godmother (the list goes on and on), know you are thinking about her than with a home-made mother’s day craft.

I love making holiday crafts and my favorite Mother’s Day project is Chicago Speech and More’s “Mother’s Day Vase”. It is easy, educational, fun and makes a great finished product! All you need is different colored construction paper, scissors, pen/marker and some glue.

Steps for making the Mother’s Day Vase:

  1. Trace a vase on a piece of colored construction paper. Chicago Speech and More recommends using light, spring-like colors for your vase (yellow, purple, pink). Encourage your child to choose and ask for a specific color. “May I haveChicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vase the yellow vase?” Depending on your child’s age and ability level, either cut the vase out or have your child cut it out themselves. Note: the opening (round part) of the vase can be difficult to navigate with a scissors.
  2.  Glue the vase onto a piece of white construction paper. You can use white card-stock to make it more durable. Work with your children to place the vase in the center. Help them with the glue. Note: a glue-stick works well with this project.
  3. Trace flowers (at least 3) on various colors of construction papeChicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vaser. Chicago Speech and More recommends using bright colors. Encourage your child to choose and ask for specific colors. “May I have the red, purple and orange flowers?” Depending on your child’s age and ability level, either cut the flowers out for them or have your children cut them out themselves.
  4. Trace circles (at least 3) on yellow construction paper. These will be the Chicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vasemiddle of your flowers. Depending on your child’s age and ability level, either cut the circles out for them or have your children cut them out themselves. Note: make circles large enough so that your child will be able to write on them (one letter per circle).
  5. Glue the circles in the middle of the flowers. Use vocabulary words such asChicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vase: middle, center, in, on, first, next, last. Encourage your child to use these words to talk about what they are doing.
  6. Trace “stems” (at least 3) on green construction paper. Cut strips about a ¼ of an inch in width and between 4-6 inChicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Postches in length. Depending on your child’s age and ability level, either cut the stems out for them or have your children cut them out themselves. Note: the size of the strips does not make a huge difference. Make them longer to start and you can always trim down the length after.Chicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vase
  7. Glue the stems to the back of the flowers. Put the stem up to the center of the flower. Use vocabulary words such as: flower, stem, center, middle, first, next last. Encourage your child to use these words to talk about what they are doing.Chicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vase
  8. Arrange the flowers in the vase. Discuss the order the flowers should go. Does your child want the red flower to come first, the blue, purple? How about an ABA pattern (red, purple, red)? Note: Remind them that they will be spelling M-O-M out on the flowers so the color order will need to stay.
  9. Glue the flowers. Chicago Speech and More recommends staggering the flowers for a more natural look. Note: it helps to glue the stem to the white construction paper and part of the flower to the vase if possible.Chicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vase
  10. Help your child write M-O-M on the flowers.
  11. Write a Mother’s Day message on the front of the vase. Depending on the age and ability of your child, help them to create a message. It is usually best to draw lines on the vase to give your child a visual area to write on. If your child isn’t able to write independently but can copy written work, draft the message together, write it on a separate piece of paper and have your child copy it onto the vase. If this is too advanced for your child, have them dictate theChicago Speech and More's Mother's Day Vasemessage to you. Start with “Happy Mother’s Day”. Discuss other items you can enclose in your message. Let your child come up with ideas. Once you have finished your message, explain how we close letters with “love, yours truly, from, etc.”. When the message is complete, have your child read the message back to you. Reading practice plus a language activity- what could be better?
  12. Encourage your child to retell the steps it took to create this master-piece. Work with them to use sequential vocabulary: first, next, then, second, last, finally. Positional vocabulary: on, in, under, first, middle, center, last.

Chicago Speech and More wishes you a very happy Mother’s Day! For more holiday/seasonal language activities please visit archive posts in Sam’s Blog.

Tips for Prodcuing the /f/ Sound by Chicago Speech and More

Chicago Speech and More's tips for producing /f/Tips for Producing /f/

 

Is your child having trouble making the /f/ sound? If so, here are Chicago Speech and More’s tips for helping teach this sound.  The /f/ sound is actually an *earlier acquired sound with mastery expected around the age of 4 years. Note the *. If your child is having trouble with this sound they are not alone! While it might seem like an “easy” sound, /f/ can actually be quite tricky.

*If your child still has difficulty with /f/ past age 4 it is recommended to seek guidance from a trained and licensed speech-language pathologist. Call Chicago Speech and More at (847) 774-0582*

 

It doesn’t hurt to practice at home with your little ones. Here are some tips from Chicago Speech and More for helping your child to produce the /f/ sound.

Therapy Hierarchy- Sounds to Conversation

 

Sound Level                                                                                                                                    

As with most sounds, it’s best to start at the sound level.  Production of /f/ is visual- Yay! Because it is visual it’s easier to teach.  To produce the /f/ sound, rest your front teeth lightly on your lower lip and blow out air.  Work with your child in front of a mirror. Show them how it looks when you make the /f/ sound and have them imitate the action.  To demonstrate airflow, have your child put their hand in front of their mouth when articulating /f/ to feel the air coming through.

Syllable Level                                                                                                                          

Once your child has mastered the ability to produce the /f/ sound move onto the syllable level.  Try adding a vowel to the end or beginning of the sound (“fa, fee, fo, foo”). While most children find it easier to produce syllables when the target sound occurs at the beginning (“fa”), this is not always the case. Some kiddos find it easier to produce the sound at the end of the word (“ef”). Try out both positions to see what works best for your child and work on the one they are most successful with.

Word Level                                                                                                                           

When you child can say syllables move onto the word level.  If it was easier for your child to produce syllables beginning with the target sound, use words beginning with the sound (“fat, fit, foot, feet”).  If your child had more success when the sound occurred in the final position, begin with words ending in /f/ (“ef, beef, loaf” ).  Begin with whichever position your child is more successful with and progress throughout all word positions (initial, medial (bathtub), final). I have found it beneficial to continue using a mirror at this stage.

Phrase/Sentence Level                                                                                                      

Once mastery is achieved at the word level, begin to add these words into phrases and then sentences.  Using carrier phrases such as “The ______” (phrase level) or “I see _____”  or “I want the______” (sentence level) can provide additional opportunities to use the target sound. Try coming up with different carrier phrases. Don’t be afraid to get a little silly with your children.

Paragraph/Short Story Level                                                                                      

Following accurate production at the sentence level, move onto paragraphs. The easiest way to do this is to create a simple story containing the target sound /f/ and have your child retell it back to you. Make sure you use words containing /f/ in all word positions.

Conversation Level                                                                                              

The last step in our hierarchy is to practice the /f/  in conversations.  Although there might be occasional speech sound errors, your child should be producing /f/ correctly most of the time.

Speech Therapy Activities for the /f/ Sound

 

Let’s face it- kids just want to have fun. Practicing speech sounds is no exception. There are plenty of fun activities to incorporate into your speech therapy.  Here are a few of Chicago Speech and More’s favorites:

  • Picture cards are great and can be used to play memory or go-fish. These games can be used at various levels in our speech therapy hierarchy.  (Word level -child simply labels the card. Phrase level- “the ________”. Sentence Level- “I picked the___________”, “Do you have the ___________”, etc.).
  • If your child is artistic, have them create their own /f/ picture cards.
  • Go through a magazine and cut out different pictures of items that have the /f/ sound in them. Make a collage with the pictures.
  • You can also play games like “I Spy” and find words containing the target sound /f/.

*Click the link below for Chicago Speech and More’s pictures of /f/ in all word positions. (The first link is /f/ in the initial position and the second has /f/ in the medial and final positions). Make 2 copies and cut apart to use in Memory or Go-Fish.

/f/ picture cards (initial word position)

/f/ picture cards (medial and final positions)

The possibilities are endless- just remember to have fun.

For more helpful tips please visit archive posts under Sam’s Blog on Chicago Speech and More’s website.

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips

Spring Vocabulary List: Speech and Language Activities

Spring Vocabulary List: Speech and Language ActivitiesSpring Vocabulary List: Speech and Language Activities

 

Spring is Coming!  The days are longer, the birds are chirping and most of all the sun is out. Chicago Speech and More wanted to share the Spring Vocabulary List to be used for a variety of speech and language activities.

There is a lot of research behind the importance of incorporating meaningful vocabulary words into speech and language activities.  Not only does it teach new words, using meaningful vocabulary is functional. If we tailor therapy activities to include relevant material, our children will be more engaged and apt to generalize (carry-over) skills.

Below is Chicago Speech and More’s Spring Vocabulary List.  This vocabulary list can be used for a variety of speech and language goals. Depending on your child’s area (s) of need, this list can be modified for their intervention plan.

Chicago Speech and More’s Spring Vocabulary List

April daisy leaves spring cleaning
ball Easter May sunglasses
baseball eggs Mother’s Day sunshine
bat flowers news storm
birds green new temperature
bloom grass pollen thunder
Blue Jay grasshopper pouring tulip
break grow puddles umbrella
bugs hatch rabbit warm
butterfly hop rain weather
chick ice cream rain coat windy
cicada kite rainbow
daffodil lamb slide

 

How to Adapt the Winter Vocabulary List for Speech and Language Therapy

Speech (Articulation Therapy) Activities: If your child is working on a specific sound or group of sounds, simply find the target (sound/group/process) within this list.

  • Here are some examples of how to use the spring vocabulary list as a guide for articulation therapy:
    • /s/ is the target: slide, sunglasses, storm
    • /s/ blends: slide, spring cleaning, storm
    • /l/ blends: Blue Jay, flowers, slide
    • /r/: April, break, green, rainbow, umbrella, warm
    • multi-syllabic words: butterfly, cicada, daffodil, grasshopper, temperature, umbrella
    • Cluster Reduction: slide, storm, Blue Jay, slide, flower

Language Activities:  Depending on your child’s language needs, the spring vocabulary list can be adapted for their therapy.

  • Here are some examples of how to use the spring vocabulary as a guide for language therapy:
    • Sequencing: Have your child tell you various spring-related sequences (i.e., steps for getting dressed to play at the park, planting flowers, getting ready to go outside in the rain)
    • Re-telling/summarizing: Tell your child a story, using words from the winter vocabulary list and have them retell it to you.
    • Story-telling: Have your child tell you a spring-related story, using vocabulary from the list.
    • Categorizing: Generate a list of categories from the vocabulary list and have your child group the words (i.e., category groups: clothing, activities, weather…)
    • Conversation: Engage your child in a conversation about spring-related items.  Ask and encourage them to ask open-ended questions. (rather than yes/no questions) Model asking follow-up questions.
    • Describing: (Cut up the vocabulary list and put the words in a box.) Have your child choose a word from the box and describe the item without saying the word.

These are just some suggestions but the possibilities are endless.  Get creative. Add your own words and activities.

With the warm weather comes a ton of new vocabulary words. These activities can be done inside or outside. Go for a nature walk or just hang out in the backyard.   Just make sure to talk about what you are doing while you are doing it, afterwards and then again-later!

Chicago Speech and More hopes you have a wonderful spring season!

For more speech and language activities please refer to archive blog posts.

Chicago Speech and More recommends Letter Factory by Leap Frog

Chicago Speech and More recommends Letter Factory by Leap FrogChicago Speech and More recommends Letter Factory by Leap Frog

 

There are so many toys, video games and DVDs to choose from.  Chicago Speech and More recommends the DVD Letter Factory by Leap Frog. If you are looking for something engaging and educational, Letter Factory is it.

Letter Factory is a fun and successful way to encourage early reading skills.  Popular Leap Frog characters take your children on a wacky phonics adventure. The video teaches the alphabet, letter names and letter sounds through fun and catchy sounds. Just wait, after a few viewings you will be seeing the songs along with your kids.

This video REALLY works.

After hearing and seeing the great success this video had with my students, I bought it for my four-year old nephew’s birthday.  I wasn’t sure if giving him a DVD for his birthday would start a major melt-down, but I figured it was worth a try. Honestly, how many toys can one little boy have?  When he opened the gift he didn’t get too excited but he didn’t cry either.  Thinking the video might not be too popular, my sister put in her car DVD player.  At least this way she could make sure it was watched. About a week later my sister called to tell me that not only was my nephew addicted to the video, my two-year old niece was as well.  After a few weeks both of them could identify every letter and provide the sound it made.  It was amazing.

I know there is some controversy over letting your children watch too much TV. While I wouldn’t encourage placing them in front of the tube for hours on end, the 35 minutes of Letter Factory will do more good than harm. Chicago Speech and More knows reading is so important! It is never too early to introduce pre-literacy and early reading skills to your little ones. Letter Factory is a great supplement to reading and discussing books with your toddlers and pre-kindies.

Leap Frog makes a bunch of great products but Letter Factory is by far my favorite.  I can’t stress it enough—the success is mind-blowing.  I have seen it work in numerous children and even those in my own family! I suggest it to friends, relatives and even my client’s parents.  Do your children a favor and purchase Letter Factory by Leap Frog as soon as possible.

For information on purchasing Letter Factory by Leap Frog click the link provided:

Letter Factory video by Leap Frog

 

Chicago Speech and More Recommends Decoma Day Camp

Decoma Day Camp

Chicago Speech and More Recommends Decoma Day Camp

 

Even though the snow is falling, the summer season is fast approaching.  It might not feel like it but the time to enroll your child in camp is now.  Don’t miss out on giving your child the best summer possible. Chicago Speech and More recommends Decoma Day Camp.

Day camp is extremely fun and it encourages social and communication skills.  At Decoma  children have the opportunity to explore new activities under the supervision of experienced counselors.  Campers learn to get along with others and work together as a group.  Decoma Day Camp offers team-building opportunities through various team sports, special event days and group collaboration.  Children also get to challenge themselves in individual activities such as: rock climbing, archery, mountain biking, arts and crafts, swimming and so much more.  Campers participate in creative and stimulating activities designed for their developmental level.

At Decoma Day Camp your child is treated like family.  Each of the directors prides themselves on getting to know your child personally.  Parents receive phone calls, progress reports and newsletters throughout the summer updating them on their child’s activities and progress at camp.  Decoma Day Camp offers an open-door policy and invites parents to drop-in to visit their little ones during their camp day.  Counselors and staff members are either school teachers or college students working toward a degree in education or recreation.Decoma Day Camp

Chicago Speech and More knows that sending your children off to camp can be scary. One conversation with Gary at Decoma will alleviate all your fears. Decoma Day Camp works with your family to provide the best possible summer experience. At Decoma each child is treated as an individual. Parents can rest easy knowing that their children are having the time of their lives in a secure, non-competitive environment.

Children often wonder why they can’t attend Decoma Day Camp every day of the year. It’s no wonder Decoma Day Camp is celebrating their 65th summer.  There really is no better place on earth. You owe it yourselves and most of all to your children! Chicago Speech and More recommends Decoma Day Camp as the answer to your summer needs.

What are you waiting for? Call today for information (847) 945-4455.

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