In-Home Pediatric Speech Therapy

Call Today:

(847) 774-0582

Tips

Tips for Prodcuing the /f/ Sound by Chicago Speech and More

Chicago Speech and More's tips for producing /f/Tips for Producing /f/

 

Is your child having trouble making the /f/ sound? If so, here are Chicago Speech and More’s tips for helping teach this sound.  The /f/ sound is actually an *earlier acquired sound with mastery expected around the age of 4 years. Note the *. If your child is having trouble with this sound they are not alone! While it might seem like an “easy” sound, /f/ can actually be quite tricky.

*If your child still has difficulty with /f/ past age 4 it is recommended to seek guidance from a trained and licensed speech-language pathologist. Call Chicago Speech and More at (847) 774-0582*

 

It doesn’t hurt to practice at home with your little ones. Here are some tips from Chicago Speech and More for helping your child to produce the /f/ sound.

Therapy Hierarchy- Sounds to Conversation

 

Sound Level                                                                                                                                    

As with most sounds, it’s best to start at the sound level.  Production of /f/ is visual- Yay! Because it is visual it’s easier to teach.  To produce the /f/ sound, rest your front teeth lightly on your lower lip and blow out air.  Work with your child in front of a mirror. Show them how it looks when you make the /f/ sound and have them imitate the action.  To demonstrate airflow, have your child put their hand in front of their mouth when articulating /f/ to feel the air coming through.

Syllable Level                                                                                                                          

Once your child has mastered the ability to produce the /f/ sound move onto the syllable level.  Try adding a vowel to the end or beginning of the sound (“fa, fee, fo, foo”). While most children find it easier to produce syllables when the target sound occurs at the beginning (“fa”), this is not always the case. Some kiddos find it easier to produce the sound at the end of the word (“ef”). Try out both positions to see what works best for your child and work on the one they are most successful with.

Word Level                                                                                                                           

When you child can say syllables move onto the word level.  If it was easier for your child to produce syllables beginning with the target sound, use words beginning with the sound (“fat, fit, foot, feet”).  If your child had more success when the sound occurred in the final position, begin with words ending in /f/ (“ef, beef, loaf” ).  Begin with whichever position your child is more successful with and progress throughout all word positions (initial, medial (bathtub), final). I have found it beneficial to continue using a mirror at this stage.

Phrase/Sentence Level                                                                                                      

Once mastery is achieved at the word level, begin to add these words into phrases and then sentences.  Using carrier phrases such as “The ______” (phrase level) or “I see _____”  or “I want the______” (sentence level) can provide additional opportunities to use the target sound. Try coming up with different carrier phrases. Don’t be afraid to get a little silly with your children.

Paragraph/Short Story Level                                                                                      

Following accurate production at the sentence level, move onto paragraphs. The easiest way to do this is to create a simple story containing the target sound /f/ and have your child retell it back to you. Make sure you use words containing /f/ in all word positions.

Conversation Level                                                                                              

The last step in our hierarchy is to practice the /f/  in conversations.  Although there might be occasional speech sound errors, your child should be producing /f/ correctly most of the time.

Speech Therapy Activities for the /f/ Sound

 

Let’s face it- kids just want to have fun. Practicing speech sounds is no exception. There are plenty of fun activities to incorporate into your speech therapy.  Here are a few of Chicago Speech and More’s favorites:

  • Picture cards are great and can be used to play memory or go-fish. These games can be used at various levels in our speech therapy hierarchy.  (Word level -child simply labels the card. Phrase level- “the ________”. Sentence Level- “I picked the___________”, “Do you have the ___________”, etc.).
  • If your child is artistic, have them create their own /f/ picture cards.
  • Go through a magazine and cut out different pictures of items that have the /f/ sound in them. Make a collage with the pictures.
  • You can also play games like “I Spy” and find words containing the target sound /f/.

*Click the link below for Chicago Speech and More’s pictures of /f/ in all word positions. (The first link is /f/ in the initial position and the second has /f/ in the medial and final positions). Make 2 copies and cut apart to use in Memory or Go-Fish.

/f/ picture cards (initial word position)

/f/ picture cards (medial and final positions)

The possibilities are endless- just remember to have fun.

For more helpful tips please visit archive posts under Sam’s Blog on Chicago Speech and More’s website.

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips

Tips for Producing the /s/ Sound by Chicago Speech and More

boy smilingIs your child having trouble producing the /s/ sound?  If so, they’re not alone. The /s/ is a very tricky sound. It typically emerges around three years of age although is not generally mastered until seven or eight.

The /s/ sound is produced with the tip of the tongue just behind the front teeth.  The tongue is close to the palate, roof of the mouth, but does not touch it. The sides of the tongue are elevated and touch the upper side teeth. Because of the tongue position, a groove should form down the center of the tongue providing a passage for continuous air stream. The teeth should be nearly closed in a bite position. The lips should be parted, in the position of a smile.

Saying “th” for /s/ is a common error amongst kids.  This is typically the error pattern people think of when hearing the word lisp. Some children substitute other sounds for /s/. Other children completely omit the /s/ sound, especially when it occurs in a blend (“pider/spider, cool/school, led/sled”). Not to harp on my nephew (see steps for producing “th” for more stories) but this story is too great to miss.  When my nephew was 3 years old (now 6), he put on a white blanket and started running around the house saying “look Tami (Sami), I’m a cary goat”.  I knew he was trying to say scary but I couldn’t understand why he would want to be a scary goat.  My sister clarified that he was in fact trying to be a “scary ghost.”

*If your child still has difficulty with the /s/ sound by 8 years of age it is recommended that you seek guidance from a trained and licensed speech-language pathologist. *

 

It doesn’t hurt to practice at home with your little ones.  Here are some tips from Chicago Speech and More for helping your child to produce the /s/ sound.

Speech Therapy Hierarchy- from sounds to conversations

Sound Level

As with most sounds, it’s best to start at the sound level.  Production of /s/ has some visual components– grab a mirror. Have your child watch as you make the sound (make sure to hold /s/ for a few seconds). Then haave him watch himself in the mirror making the sound, continue to produce it with him. Sometimes it is helpful to tell your child to “smile with their teeth closed”

Sam the Snake

“Sam the Snake”

or “pretend to a bite an apple” to help them get their articulators in the right position.  I have had great success using the “hissing snake method”.  I typically introduce my pointer finger to my students as “Sam the Snake”. I move my finger in a snaking ess on the table or desk in front of us while vocalizing “s-s-s-s-s-s”.  The child then gets to name their “snake” (finger) and move it along while producing the sound.  The “snake” works as a great tactile reminder throughout the speech hierarchy.

Syllable Level

Once your child has mastered the ability to produce the /s/ sound, move to the syllable level.  Try adding a vowel to the end or beginning of the sound (sa, see, soo, say, or ess, oss, iss). While most children find it easier to produce syllables when the target sound occurs at the beginning (sa), this is not always the case. Try out both positions to see what works best for your child and work on the one they are most successful with. Remember to incorporate any cues your child found helpful.

Word Level

When you child can say syllables, move onto the word level.  If it was easier for your child to produce syllables beginning with the target sound, use words beginning with the sound  (sun, santa, sail).  If your child had more success when the sound occurred in the final position, begin with words ending in /s/ (lace, class, fox).  Begin with whichever position your child is more successful with and progress throughout all word positions (initial, medial (bracelet), final). I have found it beneficial to continue using a mirror at this stage and of course “Sam the Snake”.

Phrase/Sentence Level

Once mastery is achieved at the word level, begin to add these words into phrases and then sentences.  Using carrier phrases such as “The ______” (phrase level) or “I see a ___________” or “Sometimes Sally says______” (sentence level) can provide additional opportunities to use the target sound. Try coming up with different carrier phrases. Don’t be afraid to get a little silly with your children.

Paragraph/Short Story Level

Following accurate production at the sentence level, move onto paragraphs. The easiest way to do this is to create a simple story containing your target sound (/s/) and have your child retell it back to you.

Conversation Level

The last step in our hierarchy is to practice the /s/ in conversations.  Although there might be occasional speech sound errors, your child should be producing /s/ correctly most of the time.

Speech Therapy Activities for /s/ Sound

Let’s face it- kids just want to have fun.  Practicing speech sounds is no exception. There are plenty of fun activities to incorporate into your speech therapy.  Here are a few of Chicago Speech and More’s favorites:

  • Picture cards are great and can be used to play memory or go-fish. These games can be used at various levels in our speech therapy hierarchy.  (Word level -child simply labels the card. Phrase level- “the ________”. Sentence Level- “I picked the___________”, “Do you have the ___________”, etc.).
  • Have your child create their own /s/ picture cards.
  • Make a sun (or any word that has an /s/ in it) out of construction paper and have your child glue various /s/ pictures on the sun.  Model the phrase “(target word) on the sun”. *Double /s/ opportunity when you include “on the sun”.
  • Go through a magazine and cut out different pictures of items that have the /s/  sound in them. Make a collage with the pictures.
  • Play games like “I Spy” and find words containing the target sound /s/. *Double /s/ opportunity when you include carrier phrase “I spy”.

*Click on the link for /s/ initial pictures. Print out 2 copies and cut apart to use for Memory or Go-Fish.

s initial picture cards

The possibilities are endless- just remember to have fun.

 

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips

Tips for Producing the “th” Sound by Chicago Speech and More

Tips for Producing the “th” Sounproducing the "th' soundd

Thursday is the perfect day to practice producing the “th” sound with your child.  There are two different “th” sounds in the English language: the voiced “th” (this, though, then) and the voiceless “th” (Thursday, think, thumb). Although both sounds are produced with the same mouth position, the voiced “th” requires use of the vocal cords.

The “th” sound is difficult to produce and many children have trouble with it.  Until he was six, my nephew said “hank-you” (for thank-you) which we thought was the cutest thing until he asked us if we were eating turkey for Hanksgiving- what’s cuter than that?  While some children say the “th” sound right away, mastery isn’t expected until age seven (voiceless “th”) and age eight (voiced “th”).

*If your child still has difficulty with “th” at these ages it is recommended to seek guidance from a trained and licensed speech-language pathologist. *

 

It doesn’t hurt to practice at home with your little ones. Here are some tips from Chicago Speech and More for helping your child to produce the “th” sound.

Speech Therapy Hierarchy- from sounds to conversation

Sound Level                                                                                                                                    

As with most sounds, it’s best to start at the sound level.  Production of “th” is visual, making it great to teach.  To produce either sound (voiced or voiceless), place the tongue tip between your teeth while blowing air at the same time. Work with your child in front of a mirror. Show them how it looks when you make the “th” sound and have them imitate the action.  To demonstrate airflow, have your child put their hand in front of their mouth when articulating “th” to feel the air coming through. When producing the voiced “th” have your child place their finger(s) on your throat to feel the vibration your vocal cords make.

Syllable Level                                                                                                                          

Once your child has mastered the ability to produce the “th” sound move onto the syllable level.  Try adding a vowel to the end or beginning of the sound (tha, they, thee, the, tho or ath, eth, ith). While most children find it easier to produce syllables when the target sound occurs at the beginning (tha), this is not always the case. Try out both positions to see what works best for your child and work on the one they are most successful with.

Word Level                                                                                                                           

When you child can say syllables move onto the word level.  If it was easier for your child to produce syllables beginning with the target sound, use words beginning with the sound (thumb, thanks, this, that).  If your child had more success when the sound occurred in the final position, begin with words ending in “th” (bath, with, bathe).  Begin with whichever position your child is more successful with and progress throughout all word positions (initial, medial (bathtub), final). I have found it beneficial to continue using a mirror at this stage.

Phrase/Sentence Level                                                                                                      

Once mastery is achieved at the word level, begin to add these words into phrases and then sentences.  Using carrier phrases such as “The ______” (phrase level) or “This is a ___________” or “They have a ______” (sentence level) can provide additional opportunities to use the target sound. Try coming up with different carrier phrases. Don’t be afraid to get a little silly with your children.

Paragraph/Short Story Level                                                                                      

Following accurate production at the sentence level, move onto paragraphs. The easiest way to do this is to create a simple story containing your target sound (“th”) and have your child retell it back to you.

Conversation Level                                                                                              

The last step in our hierarchy is to practice the “th” in conversations.  Although there might be occasional speech sound errors, your child should be producing “th” correctly most of the time.

Speech Therapy Activities for “th” Sound

Let’s face it- kids just want to have fun.Practicing speech sounds is no exception. There are plenty of fun activities to incorporate into your speech therapy.  Here are a few of Chicago Speech and More’s favorites:

  • Picture cards are great and can be used to play memory or go-fish. These games can be used at various levels in our speech therapy hierarchy.  (Word level -child simply labels the card. Phrase level- “the ________”. Sentence Level- “I picked the___________”, “Do you have the ___________”, etc.).
  • If your child is artistic, have them create their own “th” picture cards.
  • Go through a magazine and cut out different pictures of items that have the “th” sound in them. Make a collage with the pictures.
  • You can also play games like “I Spy” and find words containing the target sound “th”.

*Click the link below for pictures of “th” in all word positions. Make 2 copies and cut apart to use in Memory or Go-Fish.

“th” picture cards

The possibilities are endless- just remember to have fun.

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips

Everyday Activities to Help Develop your Child’s Language Skills

Take advantage of language opportunities in everyday activities.

Talk about EVERYTHING you are doing, what you see, and where you are going.

*Use snack and meal times to increase vocabulary

  • talk about how things taste, feel and look.
  • encourage your child to request various food items (start by offering them two choices)
  • bake cookies together and follow a recipe making sure to emphasize sequential vocabulary (first, second, third)

*Read to your child daily– stories, poems, nursery rhymes, etc.

  • talk about the stories while you are reading
  • ask your child to predict what happens next.
  • ask follow-up questions (re-cap information after every page or two)
  • practice summarizing or re-telling what happened in the story using specific vocabulary (first, beginning, second, middle, then, next, last)
  • model these responses to provide an example of what this would look/sound like

*Help your child practice thinking in categories by dividing pictures and objects into  groups

  • begin at a very basic level, (i.e., sorting pictures into categories of “things I like” and “things I don’t like”)
  • move onto colors, shapes, functions, beginning and ending letter sounds…the possibilities are endless

*Use fun activities and games to teach vocabulary and language skills

  • play games involving “spatial terms” (i.e., under, in front of, etc.)
  • play games that focus on following directions (i.e., “Simon Says”)
  • play games that encourage descriptive language skills (i.e., “I Spy”)
  • engage in imaginative play with your child–follow their lead and see where it takes you

**Just Remember**Talk about EVERYTHING: recap your day, your grocery store experience, your trip to the zoo…ANYTHING!

Make sure your child knows that you want to hear what they have to say!

 

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips

Tips for Talking with your Disfluent Child

Tips for talking with your disfluent child. Stuttering is a speech/language impairment characterized by disruptions in the forward flow of speech (or “speech disfluencies”). These can look like repetitions of whole words or parts of words, prolongations of sounds, or complete blockages of sound.

Here are some tips for talking with your disfluent child

  1. Talk to your child slowly and clearly
  2. Avoid comments like “talk slower”, “slow down”, “think about what you are trying to say” and “take a deep breath”
  3. Avoid drawing attention to the disfluent moments (don’t hold the child’s face or tell them to “look at me”)
  4. Provide positive verbal praise for talking (i.e., “you are a good talker” or “I like the way you said that”)
  5. Don’t correct or interrupt him when he or she is talking
  6. Listen patiently until the child is finished speaking *maintain consistent and appropriate eye contact
  7. Respond the same to disfluent speech as you would to fluent speech
  8. Delay your responses to allow for more pauses
  9. Reduce the number of questions you ask your child *Instead of asking questions comment on what your child has said
  10. Don’t make your child practice saying certain words or sounds
  11. TRY TO MINIMIZE STRESS

 

Categories : Sam's Blog, Tips
Ontoplist.com
Online Marketing
Add blog to our directory.
gold badge
Chicagospeechandmore.com is gold certified
blogrankings.com
Health Blogs - Blog Rankings
Active Search
Active Search Results
Manta
Sitelock
website security
exactseek
Chicago, IL - Phone: (847) 774-0582
© Copyright 2012, All Rights Reserved
Powered by WordPress. Designed by WordPress Themes by ProGo